Danny’s Reading Series

August 16, 2010

The Danny’s Tavern Reading Series

August 18th 2010!

9th Anniversary Reading

Featuring readings by Patrick Culliton, Devin King, and Caroline Picard

Patrick Culliton’s chapbook Hornet Homily is available from Octopus Books. Recent work has appeared, or will soon, in Another Chicago Magazine, Beeswax, Conduit, Eleven Eleven and elsewhere. He teaches at UIC and Loyola.

Devin King’s first book CLOPS is out from the Green Lantern Press. He lives and works in Chicago.

Caroline Picard is the Founding Director of The Green Lantern Gallery & Press, and a Co-Editor for the literary podcast The Parlor (www. theparlorreads.com). Her writing has been published in a handful of publications including the Phildelphia Independant, NewCity, Lumpen, MAKE Magazine, the Chicago Art Journal Review and Proximity Magazine.

posted by Caroline Picard

Newcity published a blurb/interview that I pulled together with Nick Butcher. I’ve posted it below. He’s playing at the Empty Bottle this week. Which is rad. Go here to see the article in its original context–

Jun 22

Soundcheck: Nick Butcher’s bicycle is still complicated

Nick Butcher is always working. He works across fields, with a visual art practice, he co-runs an independent print shop, Sonnenzimmer, with his ongoing collaborator Nadine Nakanishi, and he makes music. When he performs, he sits at a table with a plethora of curious objects: the guitar is the most recognizable, the others—electronic boxes, sticks, static surfaces—he collages together, creating walls of changing, textured sound. His two records, “The Complicated Bicycle” and “Bee Removal,” are available on Hometapes and in commemoration of a five-year anniversary since the release of “The Complicated Bicycle,” Butcher is re-releasing the record with a bonus disk containing new tracks, and performing at the Empty Bottle.

“For me the best art and music just happens,” he says. “It happens in that space where you weren’t thinking, that could be a doodle or it could be a few random notes played on a guitar. There is something that happens in that unconscious moment that I can’t quite put my finger on. There is an utter honesty to it that I find really cool. For me, this intuitive approach is the closest I can get to understanding how the world works. Because for that brief moment, I feel connected to something larger, outside of myself. So, for me, making music is a way to harness those moments and shape them into something further. To do this I use the crappiest equipment around. A cheap sampling keyboard (Casio SK-1) and a few cassette-tape recorders with handmade cassette tape loops in them. For source material, I use an acoustic guitar, or found sounds. Doors closing, coins spinning, etc…This allows me to record snippets of sounds intuitively onto the loops which, when played back, arrange themselves into repetitive patterns, unveiling the underlying structure. From there I add and subtract accent notes on the keyboard or guitar, then record another loop to play along with the first one. There’s not really an end point in mind, just a continuous morphing song cloud that shapes and shifts as it moves along. For my recordings, I take the same approach, but dump stuff onto a computer to be further edited into more focused compositions, which also allows room for incorporating beats, key changes, etc. For this reason, my performances and the recordings are two different yet connected things.” (Caroline Picard)

Nick Butcher plays the Empty Bottle, 1035 North Western, (773)276-3600, June 30 at 9:30pm.

This Year’s Lit 50

June 10, 2010

posted by Caroline Picard

This was published in Newcity’s weekly magazine. Happy to see one Zach Dodson in there and, of course, Jesse Ball. You can read the entire list and blurbs by going here.

Lit 50: Who really books in Chicago 2010

Illustration: Pamela Wishbow

A strange and unpleasant wind blows through the literary land. Our obsession with technocultural toys, whether iPhones, iPads or Kindles, makes the foundation of thought almost since thought was recorded, that is ink on paper, seem increasingly destined to be twittered into obsolescence. And it’s not just mere media frenzy, either. Massive upheaval among major publishers these last few years has left some of Chicago’s finest writers stranded in a strange land: that is, the work is finished, but no one is around to put it out. Who knows, maybe in two years when this version of Lit 50 returns, some, if not all, of our authors will be publishing mostly, if not entirely, in the digital realm. If that’s the case, let’s enjoy an old-fashioned book or two while we can.

As noted, this year’s list is limited to authors, poets, book designers and so on, with next year bringing back the behind-the-scenesters. As it was, this year’s project was daunting, with 126 viable names in consideration for fifty slots. The loss of our last #1 is most noteworthy, with the passing of Studs Terkel, but the list is populated by nineteen new faces, who either return to the list after an absence or show up for the first time. To make way for new names, some stalwarts had to be set aside; in many cases, this was due to their status as still between projects since our last go-round. We tried to limit ourselves in most cases to those with new work published between 2008 and 2010.

Lit 50 was written by Brian Hieggelke, Naomi Huffman, Tom Lynch, Andrew Rhoades and Rachel Sugar

posted by Caroline Picard

From Newcity’s 411 section:

You can read the whole piece by going here.

It’s a gallery! It’s a performance space! It’s a bookstore! It’s a café! The revived Green Lantern Gallery, temporarily housed at Chicago and Maplewood in Ukrainian Village, permanent location TBD, is aiming to be Chicago’s answer to Gertrude Stein’s living room. It’s an expanded vision of the original Green Lantern Gallery, which director Caroline Picard once ran out of her apartment. When the city shut it down due to an ordinance against such ventures, it left Picard with a choice: go big or go home (no pun intended). She’s going big. The new dream is a joint collaboration with featherproof books, another independent press interested in books that cross the boundaries between visual art and literature. “It’s like a high-school mega crush,” featherproof’s Zach Dodson says of the relationship between the presses. Picard recounts their fateful meeting at the NEXT art fair as a “marathon… of gossip and story-swapping and big-bang idea speculation.”

posted by caroline picard

I came across this nice little blurb in Newcity–

A good description of Zambreno’s book and a nice nod to the parlor (where you can go to listen to the reading)!

Kate Zambreno will read at The Parlor Tuesday, March 2nd at 7pm!

Kate Zambreno is an editor at Nightboat Books and a former senior editor of the Chicago alt-weekly, Newcity. Her reviews and essays have appeared in The Believer, Bookforum, Rain Taxi, and elsewhere. She keeps the literary blog Frances Farmer Is My Sister at http://francesfarmerismysister.blogspot.com.

Kate will read from her debut novella O Fallen Angel (Chiasmus Press), a triptych of modern-day America set in a banal Midwestern landscape, inspired by Francis Bacon’s “Three Studies for Figures at the Base of a Crucifixion” as well as Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway.

Of the book the performance artist Karen Finley wrote that “Kathy Acker would be proud” and Chris Kraus compared it to Angela Carter’s fairytales.  Books will be available for sale.

Following her 30 minute reading, Kate will take questions from the audience.

As always, the event will be recorded and published on-line for your repeated listening pleasure on iTunes and at www.theparlorreads.com

All readings take place at 1511 N. Milwaukee Ave, 2nd Floor

For more information, please visit www.theparlorreads.com or contact theparlorreads@gmail.com

The Parlor is a monthly reading series sponsored by Bad At Sports Podcast (www.badatsports.com).

posted by Caroline Picard

Newcity published its Best Of 2009 issues and a show curated by Anne Elizabeth Moore featuring print artists from Chicago and Providence was listed in the Top 5 Print Shows of 2009. You can see more of the top five list by going here.

posted by Caroline Picard

This came out in last week’s NewCity. It’s a great article talking about the DIY practice here in Chicago, what it’s been up to these last weeks and all of that. In any case, it’s worth checking out, I think–

Go here to read the whole thing….

Dec 01

At Zeroes End: Art in Chicago, 2000–2009


By Jason Foumberg

Jin Lee, "Ice 2," 2008. Courtesy devening projects + editions, ChicagoJin Lee, “Ice 2,” 2008. Courtesy devening projects + editions, Chicago

Art is long, but institutional memory is short. In many ways, Chicago’s art history is written as it occurs, in situ, by the people who produce it. Artists toil in their studios, heads-down. Apartment galleries open and close as briskly as the seasons change. We consume one-night-only events by the half-dozen, like so many bottles of free Grolsch beer. Even as new art blogs proliferate, with more scenes being represented than ever before, the snapshot commentary and weekly content often feels dated by week’s end. And yet, paintings aren’t bubblegum summer jams; they’re codified slabs of culture, philosophy and style. We seek dialogue, inspiration and long-term change. In short, we seek longevity, with lasting importance for our work and our peers’—but who has time to write contemporary history while we’re in the midst of making it?

That said, Chicago loves its art history. Outsiders, Imagists, Modernists and firebrands—memorize their precepts and you’re halfway to an MFA degree (however, please don’t leave Chicago once you earn the other half). Our traditions always feel in danger of becoming tinder for the next great fire, so we hand-cobble our history and share the stories orally like a rite of passage. This is to our strength and our detriment. History is our bind. We don’t trash Paschke or cold-shoulder Mies because we’ve worked so hard to carry their legacies. In many global art centers, successive generations of artists break with the past like rebellious teenagers, but Chicagoans do not. Here, innovation comes from influence and education. Doing otherwise, it would feel as if the whole thing could unravel.

As we approach the end of the century’s first decade, it’s time to take census of our situation. Sure, it’s an arbitrary range of numbered years, but such evocative images transpire when we speak of eras, like the twenties or the sixties, and although it’s undecided how we’ll finally refer to this special decade (the naughts? the zeroes? the twenty-first century’s toilet-training years?), the task of reflection is at hand. Somehow we survived the Y2K catastrophe (perhaps belatedly realized on 9/11), and thankfully computer art didn’t take hold in the ways that it threatened (my avatar didn’t sell a single pixilated painting in his Second Life apartment gallery) so where are we now? Ten years older, who are we? Are we struggling with a new -ism? Does a collective yearning animate our desires?

Another Gazette Review!

September 17, 2009

posted by Caroline Picard

We got an awesome review/interview by Jonathan Kaplan in NewCity’s lit section. You can read the article in its entirety here and what follows is the very short beginning….

Westward Through the Ice: Green Lantern Press looks back 200 years

By Jonathan Kaplan

proof_front-and-spine

When resurrecting a piece of writing predating the Civil War, precautions must be taken to maintain the genuine message of its words. So when Green Lantern Press decided to reissue a publication about a sea voyage during the winter of 1819-1820, they took it to a whole new level.

“The North Georgia Gazette and Winter Chronicle” came into Green Lantern’s hands as a weathered yellowing pile of newspaper pages still holding the dust and mold from almost 200 years ago. From there, the transformation became a polished and readable bound edition of a piece of history. The editors of the Gazette had to figure out their goal as far as how they were going to bring back this moment in time. Did they want to replicate the original experience or make it something completely fresh? By the time it was finished, the revised edition was aesthetically modern while keeping the heart of a work created generations ago.

posted by Caroline Picard

thanksgiving_receptionThis was published in Newcity this week. Go here to see what else was covered.

RECOMMENDED Three plastic liters of off-brand pop sit on a table next to two stacks of plastic cups and a bowl of ice. That black-and-white photo welcomes us to Jenny Walters’ party, where we get to see images of bound flowerless stalks and rolled fabric bundled tourniquet fashion around an upright vacuum cleaner, and color portraits of women of various ages, all of whom exude an air of distance, self-enclosure and alienation. As old-school feminism makes a comeback this season, Walters offers a particularly excruciating variation on the theme, introducing us to all the lonely people, whether they stand before us dolefully with an arm in a sling or hold tightly a “reborn” doll (“lifelike” simulation of a baby) with mildly distressed tenderness. Walters is not issuing a call to action; she is making a plea that we understand and feel what it means to be trapped in life, as we all are, regardless of gender. Open the pop and take a swig; it is Walters’ brand of aqua vita. (Michael Weinstein)

Through June 13 at Green Lantern Gallery, 1511 N. Milwaukee.