Prepping books

September 6, 2010

posted by caroline picard

Things are getting closer. Of course it’s still months from the point of releasing books to the public, but I’m almost finished laying out/proofing Fiction at Work–a collection of flash fiction culled from the online journal of the same name. And I’m due for the last edits of Erica’s On The Mutation of Fortune; I’m about halfway through the layout process on that one. Kordian is also almost finished and Amira’s text, Forgery, is ready for layout. And bam. There it is. Probably means we’ll release these books early next year. Hopefully, hopefully in the new space.

The space that does not, as yet, exist. I was looking at a space over in Logan Square pretty seriously. It looked amazing, a three story building with a substantial storefront. The basement, as it turns out, was almost entirely saturated with water: meaning the wooden support beams were 92% wet. The inspector had a yellow hand-held contraption with two little prongs that flipped out upon the depression of a button. When inserted into wood, they measured the water therein. So onward, yet again.

Of course I’m worried about how long it might actually take to get a space. Every single dream I’ve had this summer has involved some aspect of architecture. So much so, that I’ve almost convinced myself that all my dreams must be that way, about architecture. In the meantime, though, we’re doing great work, devising strategies to support the gallery via fundrasising, and of course the public programs and exhibits start this week. And soon, soon the bookstore will be live, on-line as well…

More updates to come.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

New location: 2542 W. Chicago Ave., Chicago, IL 60622

greenlanterngallery@gmail.com

Normal Bias

A Solo Exhibition by David Moré

Opening Reception, September 11, 7 – 10 pm

August 21st – September 18, 2010

The Green Lantern Gallery is pleased to present Normal Bias, a minor business venture by artist David Moré. From August 21st – September 11, Moré will be setting up shop in the gallery space and welcoming passers-by to participate in his free service: a portrait studio rendering the customers’ likeness in sound. The finished portraits will be documented on audiocassette, or, if requested, digitally. To take part, visitors are invited to visit the space during the hours of operation (listed below). At that time, Moré will be working and you can sit for a portrait. The accompanying exhibition from September 11th through 18th will include sound portraits recorded over the month as well as a site-specific installation that utilizes the physical, architectural space as an instrument for an experimental, auditory composition.

Utilizing a variety of idiosyncratic and unconventional instruments (some found objects, some built by Moré), the resulting portraits are responsive in form and speculative in nature.  This unique service, based on a one-to-one encounter between Moré and his sitter, stems from Moré’s interest in inviting audiences directly into his process of making sounds and creating accessible and playful contexts to experience the results.

Opening the doors wide open and putting his way of working on display, Moré’s work inaugurates the Green Lantern Gallery’s new exhibition program. Normal Bias is the first foray in which the gallery space is used for artists’ research, highlighting the process through which artists’ arrive at their creative ideas, rather than the product of their inquiry. The Green Lantern Gallery’s thematic exhibitions and artist projects are thought experiments, models for critical and social engagement, poetic ruminations, and interrogations of the creative process from all angles.

Hours of Operation:

August 21st – September 10th.

Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, 6-9 pm

Saturday: 10 – 7 p.m.

Opening Reception September 11, 2010, 7-10 pm

Exhibition will be on view through September 18, 2010

Closing Screening: Now It’s Dark, an evening of silent film accompanied by improvisational music, curated by Marc Riordan, September 18, 7 pm

Gallery Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 11-6 pm and by appointment

2542 W. Chicago Ave., Chicago, IL 60622

***

David Moré grew up outside Chicago; he has spent the past fourteen years moving between Wisconsin, Oregon, Minnesota, Maryland, and Missouri; and currently is based in Chicago. In 2004 he was quite honored to play his self-built instruments at the High Zero Festival of Improvised and Experimental Music (Baltimore), performing with such luminaries as Daniel Higgs, Joe McPhee, and Le Quan Ninh. He has remained involved with the High Zero Festival as Stage Manager ever since. His artworks, performances and sound installations have been presented through Harold Arts, Gallery 400 at UIC, and Vega Estates in Chicago.

The Green Lantern Gallery is a venue dedicated to showcasing emerging and mid career artists of all media in conjunction with the activities of Green Lantern Press and Lantern Projects. Each season, the Green Lantern Gallery develops thematic exhibitions and artist projects, supplemented by a range of public programming and publications from the Green Lantern Press. Committed to forming alternative and sustainable models for the distribution and presentation of noncommercial contemporary art, the nonprofit Gallery is partnered with the for-profit Bookstore, Cafe and Performance Space in order to explore different possibilities to support artists and community.

It has been interesting to think about the idea of space over the summer, particularly what it means to build or define it. We’ve been working it over in a number of ways–from the on-going and often Quixotic search for a permanent location, to the building of a website, and then too, the building of our on-line bookstore. In the midst of these buildings, we are, meantime, developing our rapport as a team. We meet once a week as a group to talk over our anticipated program, touch base on various issues we’re struggling with and offer updates. The website should come together with a beta version on August 25th and we’re hoping to launch it properly this September. Meantime the on-line store is supposed to go on-line this October. There will still be a period of working out the kinks also, Zach and I are pretty sure we’ll use featherproof and the Green Lantern Press as guinea pigs, load those books on the site and then see what kinds of problems arise that way, before asking for books from other presses. Since it looks like we won’t have a physical bookstore until the new year (at the earliest) we’ll have ample time to trouble shoot.

That said, there is all of this other energy in the gallery aspect of the space–we’ve pretty much squared away all of fall’s programming and it’s super exciting to know that something physical is going to manifest from that aspect of this summer’s work. Similarly, Devin has been working out the public programming/events–another interesting aspect about that issue is that, while we hope to one day have a separate performance space, this fall the gallery and the performance space are one and the same. Therefore we have to co-ordinate the physical demands of those respective projects. In other words, if a performance artist wanted to come in and do a splatter paint Galager watermellon fest, it would be impossible–because there will inevitibly be art up on the wall, or installations on the ground. It means that our fall events programming has to be fairly modest in its theatrical proportion. Thus we have a lot of readings lined up, some film screenings, a number of talks and some music events. Here too, I can’t help feeling like it’s going to help us in the long run–because I feel like we can test the waters, figure out what works and what doesn’t, and then see if we can open up our venue for larger events.

It’s all so near–right around the corner. The last two weeks feel like there’s been a lull, a little–a kind of in-between time before which we’d planned everything we possibly could plan in advance. Now, preparations are starting in a new way, to get everything ready for the ever-nearer opening in September. It’s very exciting. My favorite thing, however–I ended up in a conversation last night about the Green Lantern in which a friend of mine asked about the longevity of the project. The Green Lantern has been operating in some form for about six years. However, this new stage of developement is totally new, totally different. I thought about the Marvel Green Lantern, and then it occured to me that actually what is starting up this fall, what has been incubating this summer, is a new generation of the project. What was originally setup in my house, and put together by one group of people, is now being established off-site, by an entirely new group of people. Further, there are new aims, new interests, and with those new individuals–Zach, Abby, Devin–each arm of the project has that much more weight behind it. Something I never could have accomplished before. Obviously there will be new issues to face, other areas of weakness or tension, but it’s incredibly exciting to be a part of a project that has enough flexibility to transform.

posted by Caroline Picard

Our Resident Artist

July 21, 2010

posted by Caroline Picard

This summer, while running a particularly informal project space–proper exhibits will open up this fall–we do have an artist in residence. His will be the first show come September and I thought I’d include a post with the description of his project, along with the fancy-pants floor plan!

(You see, these things help me believe that what is going on is not just a pipe dream, but is in fact coming together and is, indeed, very real)

Portrait Studio

For July and August, David Moré will be running a minor business, a portrait studio, out of the Green Lantern Gallery. This portrait studio specializes in rendering its customers’ likeness in sound. These portraits will be creating using a variety of objects, some found, some built. The finished portraits will be documented on audiocassette, or digitally if requested. To take part in this free service, visitors are invited to visit the space during the hours of operation listed below when David Moré will be working and sit for their portrait.

The accompanying exhibition from September 11 through 17 will include sound portraits recorded over the month and a site-specific installation that utilizes the space itself as an instrument for an experimental composition.

Hours of Operation:
August 21st – September 10th.
Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, 6-9 pm
Saturday: 9 – 6 p.m.

Opening Reception September 11, 2010, 7-10 pm
Exhibition will be on view through September 17, 2010
Gallery Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 11-6 pm and by appointment

David Moré grew up outside Chicago; he has spent the past fourteen years moving between Wisconsin, Oregon, Minnesota, Maryland, and Missouri; and currently is based in Chicago. In 2004 he was quite honored to play his self-built instruments at the High Zero Festival of Improvised and Experimental Music (Baltimore), performing with such luminaries as Daniel Higgs, Joe McPhee, and Le Quan Ninh. He has remained involved with the High Zero Festival as Stage Manager ever since. His artworks, performances and sound installations have been presented through Harold Arts, Gallery 400 at UIC, and Vega Estates in Chicago.

Interview on art21blog

June 9, 2010

posted by Caroline Picard

I was lucky enough to get interviewed by Meg Onli over vacation and the interview posted! So. I thought I’d post the beginnings of it below. You can read the whole thing in its entirety by going here.

The Green Lantern | Caroline Picard

June 8th, 2010
by Meg Onli Bad at Sports

During the golden age of comic books, All-American Comics debuted Alan Scott as the Green Lantern in 1940. At the time, Scott was a railroad engineer who, when in possession of a ring had multiple powers. In Chicago, The Green Lantern is a gallery and press that exhibits and publishes emerging artists and writers. Although Founding Director Caroline Picard lacks the ability to walk through walls and read minds, she has acquired the ability to balance artmaking, running a gallery space and press, writing, and co-producing a podcast about literature.

Meg Onli: The Green Lantern operates both as a gallery and as a publisher. Did you initially see yourself having an exhibition space that also published books or did it begin as one idea that sort of grew into a larger project? Do the two projects ever cross?

Caroline Picard: Yes, actually. I’d been thinking about running a print project for years before The Green Lantern took shape in Chicago. I’d also been exposed to different gallery environments — as an undergrad, I happened into a Baltimore warehouse that had been converted into a gallery where a bunch of artists lived. And then, of course, I worked at threewalls and frequented unusal exhibition spaces here. My impression of those spaces conspired so that when I happened into the loft at 1511 N. Milwaukee Avenue, the idea of opening a gallery/press hit me all at once. The space, the press, and the gallery became a single idea at the same instant, despite being vague notions before. Having said that, my interests in writing and visual work stem from the same place. Because I’m interested in how ideas and mediums influence one another, I like drawing connections between those mediums. It’s the same with public programming. I hosted live music events, performances, screenings, lectures. I started thinking of the space as a gateway for independent and emerging art practice — practices that were not often accessed outside of more traditional, specialized venues.

MO: In the past year, The Green Lantern closed its exhibition space. There has been some discussion about the sustainability of apartment galleries if the city of Chicago continues to regulate how they are operated. What are your future plans for The Green Lantern’s gallery presence?

CP: I love this subject. I find it incredibly interesting that there is an inherent, legal conflict between the apartment gallery and the city. While the conflict seems unnecessary (and silly), it points to the way in which apartment galleries defy traditional models of business classification. The city’s laws are accidentally prohibitive of apartment spaces. The city prosecutes them because it needs money and some dude walking around wants to make his ticket quota to keep his job. To change the laws would mean navigating a bureaucratic mess of red tape. While I think it would benefit everyone to create legal avenues for idiosyncratic, non-commercial exhibition practices, I nevertheless appreciate the way that this relatively self-sustaining community defies civil categories. There is a mix of domestic and public space in which the public party becomes an intimate one. There is very little (if any) money earned from these ventures and as such, the apartment gallery illicits confusion and disbelief. When I talked to people at City Hall it was sort of like, “If it quacks like a gallery and looks like a gallery, what do you mean it’s not a gallery?” or, “You don’t sell artwork? But in these pictures, there is art on the wall. What do you mean there isn’t any revenue?” What I find most interesting, however, is that the community that attends those spaces understands how to relate to them.

posted by Caroline Picard

This last week, the Poetry Foundation held a poet talk with Jenny Boully at the Green Lantern. I recorded the middle section of that same talk here.