Don’t Piss on Me and Tell Me it’s Raining
Curated by Bad at Sports

April 7 – May 22, 2010

Opening reception: April 7, 6-8 pm

go here to read the following in its entirety…

Richard: Just talk it through? Is that too postmodern?

Duncan: I don’t know. Well, what do you want to do with the apexart essay?

Richard: Are we recording? Is this ironic or is this not ironic?

Duncan: I don’t know if it’s ironic or not, but yes, we’re recording.

Richard: I think that we should talk about the philosophy of the program. Do a little bit about how it got started. Sort of do the compressed version of that talk we did the other day. And by “we,” I mean you, mostly. The royal “we.”

Duncan: [Laughs.] So you want to start with…?

Richard: Well, I think originally, we were just screwing around, having a conversation, being dumbasses, and I think it’s evolved into something more rich, with more depth and more seriousness. I mean, I think, at this point, we’re creating an audio archive of what’s going on in the art community, or at least the art community we have access to in this time and place. And the place has expanded into more cities than it was originally. Now it’s New York, San Francisco, Los Angeles, London, Switzerland, Sweden.

So I think it’s an examination, like a time capsule of what’s going on now, and that we’ll look at this project twenty, thirty, fifty years from now—at least on a personal level—and see an interesting history of what was going on now.

Duncan: Do you think we already do that? Do you think, when you look back on the programming that we put together five years ago, it seems kind of strange? Like, what we thought was urgent at that moment versus what turned out to be kind of urgent?

Richard: Oh, it’s embarrassing. [Laughs.] I listen to those early shows and groan. We were very flip about it at first, only when people started to list us on their resumes and we started to get feedback, either…deliriously angry or deliriously happy about what we were doing…only then did we realize that we had any sort of an audience and that we might need to be conscientious about how we were doing things.

posted by Caroline Picard

I got very excited when I saw this review come along in March 19th’s NY times/ Art in Review. You can see the article in its original context by going here.

Future Phenomena: A project in the works by Amanda Browder

‘#class’

HOLLAND COTTER

// //

//

Published: March 19, 2010

Winkleman Gallery
621 West 27th Street
Chelsea
Through Saturday

Can we talk? That seems to be an urgent art world question, partly because of an economic shakedown that sensible people — i.e., the writers of art fair news releases — keep saying is over, or never happened. But New York artists, in need of jobs or apartments or ways to pay their art school loans, are pretty sure that it did happen, and that it isn’t all that over, even if the Armory Show really had an extraspecial year.

Winkleman Gallery is doing its part to keep the conversation on the boil with an exhibition called “#class,” organized by the artists Jennifer Dalton and William Powhida, who is on loan from Schroeder Romero & Shredder Gallery. The pair have turned the main exhibition space into a combination lecture hall and conference center, with big tables, sit-up-straight chairs and wall-to-wall chalkboards in a constant process of being filled and erased as the show’s events come and go.

So far, the schedule has included discussion panels titled “Success,” “Access,” “The Ivory Tower,” “The System Works” and “Bad Curating.” To get competitive juices flowing, the artist Amanda Browder of “Bad at Sports,” a Chicago-based art podcast, offered a presentation called “Battleship,” which pitted Formalists against Conceptualists, artists against dealers, and painters against the world. A bruiser, I hear.

The art historian and critic Mira Schor, author of an excellent new book called “A Decade of Negative Thinking” (Duke University Press), read an essay on the potentially positive aspects of failure and anonymity. And the writer Joanne McNeil led a panel on the notion that the art world isn’t as racially integrated as it likes to think.

So the show’s program is substantial. And there’s even something for gallerygoers in search of art on the wall. The chalkboards — think 1960s Cy Twombly — make for very entertaining reading. And Ms. Dalton and Mr. Powhida have small, conference-approved text drawings in the gallery’s back room. (They’re for sale, but with stipulations way too complicated and finicky to go into here.)

Bottom line: artists are artists’ best friends, and there should be more gatherings like this one.

Final thought: class, as in social class, is the elephant in the art fair V.I.P. rooms, in the art school studios and in Chelsea galleries. Please, can we talk? Yes we can: Friday at 2 p.m. in the gallery, the estimable art critic Ben Davis will present his “9.5 Theses on Art and Class.”

This article has been revised to reflect the following correction:

Correction: March 23, 2010
A review in the “Art in Review” column on Friday about the Aipad Photography Show New York, at the Park Avenue Armory, misspelled the surname of a photographer who has an electronically animated self-portrait in the show. She is Shirley Shor, not Shore.

Another review in the column, about “#class” at the Winkleman Gallery in Chelsea, misstated the given name of the woman who moderated a panel about racial integration in the art world and misidentified her occupation. She is Joanne McNeil, not Joan, and she is a writer, not an artist.

And another review in the column, about an exhibition of R. Crumb’s drawings for his illustrated “Book of Genesis” at the David Zwirner Gallery in Chelsea, misstated the address of the exhibition. It is 519 West 19th Street, not West 29th Street.

Next Weekend: Bookfair

February 21, 2010

posted by caroline picard

FAIR

Friday, February 26, Noon – 6 pm
Saturday, February 27, Noon – 6 pm

Two days of art, books, talks, things for sale, things for free, and more!

Organized by Temporary Services in conjunction with ART WORK: A NATIONAL CONVERSATION ABOUT ART, LABOR, AND ECONOMICS • www.artandwork.us

LOCATION
G400 Lecture Room & Gallery 400 at the Art & Design Hall, University of Illnois, Chicago
400 S. Peoria St (at Van Buren)
www.gallery400.aa.uic.edu • 312-996-6114

Antena antenapilsen.com
AREA Chicago areachicago.org
Bad At Sports badatsports.com
CAFF “Find us in the real world motherfuckers!”
Gallery 400 gallery400.aa.uic.edu
Esteban Garcia snebtor.chiguiro.org
Golden Age shopgoldenage.com
Green Lantern Press press.thegreenlantern.org
Half Letter Press halfletterpress.com
Terence Hannum terencehannum.com
Harold Arts haroldarts.org
Imperfect Articles imperfectarticles.com
InCUBATE incubate-chicago.org
Clifton Meador & guests cliftonmeador.com
David Moré
No Coast no-coast.org
Onsmith Dog Stew & Monkey Nudd Wine
Pros Arts Studio prosarts.org
Proximity Magazine proximitymagazine.com
Radah & Team
Spudnik Press spudnikpress.com
Bert Stabler bertstabler.com
threewalls three-walls.org
WhiteWalls

Sara Levine will be at The Parlor Tuesday February 2 at 7pm!

Sara Levine’s writing has appeared in Nerve, The Iowa Review, Puerto del Sol, Caketrain, Necessary Fiction, Brain, Child, The Fairy Tale Review, and other magazines.  Her essays can be found in The Touchstone Anthology of Contemporary Creative Nonfiction: 1970 to the Present and A Best of Fence.  Once upon a time she wrested a PhD in literature from Brown University and received an Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship in Humanistic Studies.  She chairs the Writing program at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Following her 30 minute reading, Sara will take questions from the audience.

As always, the event will be recorded and published on-line for your repeated listening pleasure on iTunes and at www.theparlorreads.com

All readings take place at 1511 N. Milwaukee Ave, 2nd Floor.

For more information, please visit www.theparlorreads.com or contact theparlorreads@gmail.com

The Parlor is a monthly reading series sponsored by Bad At Sports Podcast (www.badatsports.com).

posted by caroline picard

Chicago-based Young Adult Author James Kennedy will read at The Parlor

Tuesday, October 6, at 7pm

James Kennedy is the author of The Order of Odd-Fish (Random House Delacorte Press), a fantastical young adult comedy that was one of the Smithsonian’s Notable Books for Children in 2008. Booklist praised Odd-Fish as “hilarious . . . readers with a finely tuned sense of the absurd are going to adore the Technicolor ride” and Time Out Chicago described it as “a work of mischievous imagination and outrageous invention.”

James lives with his wife and daughter in Chicago. You can follow his activities at http://www.jameskennedy.com.

Following his 30 minute reading, James will take questions from the audience.

As always, the event will be recorded and published on-line for your repeated listening pleasure on iTunes and at www.theparlorreads.com

All readings take place at 1511 N. Milwaukee Ave, 2nd Floor

For more information, please visit www.theparlorreads.com or contact theparlorreads@gmail.com

The Parlor is a monthly reading series, sponsored by Bad At Sports Podcast.

terri-kapsalis

Next Week!!! Terri Kapsalis to read at The Parlor Tuesday, March 3rd, 2009 at 7pm

Terri will read an excerpt from The Hysterical Alphabet as well as a new work. Following Terri’s 30 minute reading, she will take questions from the audience.

hysterical-alphabet


As always, the event will be recorded and published on-line for your repeated listening pleasure on iTunes and at www.theparlorreads.com

Terri is a writer, performer, and cultural critic whose work appears in such publications as Short Fiction, Denver Quarterly, Parakeet, The Baffler, New Formations and Public. She is the author of The Hysterical Alphabet (WhiteWalls) and Public Privates: Performing Gynecology from Both Ends of the Speculum (Duke University Press) and the co-editor of two books related to the musician Sun Ra.  As an improvising violinist, Kapsalis has a discography that includes work with Tony Conrad, David Grubbs, and Mats Gustafsson, and she is a founding member of Theater Oobleck.  She works as a health educator at Chicago Women’s Health Center and teaches at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

All readings take place at The Green Lantern 1511 N. Milwaukee Ave, 2nd Floor

(www.thegreenlantern.org)

For more information, please visit www.theparlorreads.com or contact theparlorreads@gmail.com

The Parlor is a monthly reading series, hosted by Chicago’s Green Lantern and sponsored by Bad At Sports Podcast.