The Armory Show

*posts on volta, and other art stuffs in NYC will be posted separately*

Young Joon

I got a chance to go to the Armory fair & Volta this past weekend, and there was a lot to look at.  Being the first time I’ve gone to the New York art fairs, I didn’t know what to expect; though I have to say that I held onto the notion that commerce is really at the heart of art fairs’ existence. Since the ’90s (?), they’ve played a very real function in contemporary art–being the primary mode for displaying and dictating the trends of VALUABLE artworks.  I was also really interested in observing how current market conditions are affecting the ubiquity of these fairs–if and how the structures for widespread cultural legitimization/commodification of art will shift.  I’ve yet no declarative sentiments.  Even still, this is very exciting for me. 🙂

I took pictures of some artwork that really captured my attention–be it through the materials, color, or a more ambiguous percieved connection in ideas between myself and the art…

[click on the images for larger versions]

 

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William Pope.L
Bin (Version 2)
2008
Wood, mirrors, fake fur, rock lamp, metal handle, dvd monitor and playback
36 x 52 x23”
Mitchell-Innes & Nash (New York)

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Something about this piece feels like home–kinda like something I’d see in Chicago.  I can’t quite put my finger on it–it lacks that veil of seamlessness that many contemporary art objects strive for.  When I look at this piece, I start to develop a narrative of the work’s creation, from the inception of the artist’s ideas, to the compiling of materials, and the way the artist uses what they’ve got, the way they know how, because the artist had to make it when they did–resulting in this wierd, crazy thing that fucks with notions of singular material discourses (is it a painting? video? sculpture?); and it’s so captivating, yet unostentatious.

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Andy Coolquitt
21st century aggressive carpet growth
2008
Wood, Carpet, metal , wire, lightbulb, glass
269 x 15 x 15 cm
Galerie Krizinger Vienna

 

 

img_20761Arabella Campbell
Black Painting, 2009
Plastic tarp
48” x 60”
Catriona Jeffries

 

img_20741Loris Cecchini
Gaps (ladder)
2004
polyester resin, paint
Galleria Continua

 

img_03941Marlene Dumas
“Inverted Marilyn” 2008
40 x 50 cm
oil on canvas

K, perhaps I just haven’t seen much of Dumas’s works outside her body of monochrome portraits–but it seems she’s made a huge shift in her painting.  The way she creates this ambiguous space, and her complex, yet understated pallette, and how she physically handles the paint on the canvas–the goops, the brushwork, the finnesse of her hand–it’s all the more powerful to me–here in this very painting.  Blown away…

What did others think of the fairs?

Art Fair Tips from New York:

The Armory & Volta

by

lil elote

Just got back from the New York fairs; it was fabulous!  The parties were just crazy!  The art-myehhh.  Everything is fabulous in New York…until you run out of cash.  The fairs aren’t cheap y’all.  But you know your girl lil elote don’t let a lil thang like money hold me down-I break those motha-effing chains-YAHHHH!!!!!

Like the song says, “Don’t be fooled by all these rocks that I got, I’m still, I’m still lil’ elote from the block.”  To be exact, I’m from the mean streets of Queens-represent! HEEEEEEYYYYYYYYY.  That’s right, so I’ve still got a little hustle-game in me, and I’m gon give y’all some tips to get past the gatekeepers at the fairs for little to nothing-listen up children:

A.

You gotta walk-like you’re on the runway. Remind yourself, “I am a star! These bitches ain’t got nothing on me!”  Anyways, walk-fiercely, right past those bitches at the front taking tickets or checking wristbands.  After all, only the masses have time for checkpoints!  This method works best when you’ve got a tight outfit and you’re fully accessorized-like an upper-east side WASP, like you’re going to buy some art.  Make sure your hair and nails are all did, pat your weave; also, giant sunglasses help, “I’m not looking at you, I’m looking past you, bitch!”

B.

This second method takes a little bit more nerve and some stamina: Run your ass off, right through the checkpoint.  You should try to get a decent running start, then fly like the wind-like the time yo daddy had a little too much hennesy and he’s about to open a can of whup-ass on yo mommy and the kids.  If a bitch tries to stop you, cry, scream, and yell “get off me you Racist, Sexist, Classist bitch!” whatever you can throw at them.

C.

Obtain a press/VIP pass.  This requires some prior research.  Name-drop your ass off.  You’re an artist, but who isn’t?  So get one of the pamphlets for the fair and read the gallery names-a suprising # of them are self-named, so say you’re a personal friend of say, Kavi Gupta, David Zwirner, or Marianne Boesky.  Also, can’t forget to let them know who you are:  “I’m Terrence Koh, goddamit!”

D.

As a last resort, I suggest rubbing some shit on yourself.  I know, I know-nasty; but they don’t call it hustlin’ for nothing’.  A friend of mine told me a sure-fire tactic for making people think you’re crazy is to present yourself covered in shit (’cause sometimes people can’t see you’re crazy on the inside).  Hopefully, no one will want to touch, look, smell, or be near you.  You are exempt from all the tenets and checkpoints of civilized society.  But then again, it’s an art fair.  “Is it art?” people will wonder.  Hell the fuck yes!  Now, Move aside bitches! Respect!

I hope this was helpful y’all.

Till next time,

Xoxo

lil elote