Don’t Piss on Me and Tell Me it’s Raining
Curated by Bad at Sports

April 7 – May 22, 2010

Opening reception: April 7, 6-8 pm

go here to read the following in its entirety…

Richard: Just talk it through? Is that too postmodern?

Duncan: I don’t know. Well, what do you want to do with the apexart essay?

Richard: Are we recording? Is this ironic or is this not ironic?

Duncan: I don’t know if it’s ironic or not, but yes, we’re recording.

Richard: I think that we should talk about the philosophy of the program. Do a little bit about how it got started. Sort of do the compressed version of that talk we did the other day. And by “we,” I mean you, mostly. The royal “we.”

Duncan: [Laughs.] So you want to start with…?

Richard: Well, I think originally, we were just screwing around, having a conversation, being dumbasses, and I think it’s evolved into something more rich, with more depth and more seriousness. I mean, I think, at this point, we’re creating an audio archive of what’s going on in the art community, or at least the art community we have access to in this time and place. And the place has expanded into more cities than it was originally. Now it’s New York, San Francisco, Los Angeles, London, Switzerland, Sweden.

So I think it’s an examination, like a time capsule of what’s going on now, and that we’ll look at this project twenty, thirty, fifty years from now—at least on a personal level—and see an interesting history of what was going on now.

Duncan: Do you think we already do that? Do you think, when you look back on the programming that we put together five years ago, it seems kind of strange? Like, what we thought was urgent at that moment versus what turned out to be kind of urgent?

Richard: Oh, it’s embarrassing. [Laughs.] I listen to those early shows and groan. We were very flip about it at first, only when people started to list us on their resumes and we started to get feedback, either…deliriously angry or deliriously happy about what we were doing…only then did we realize that we had any sort of an audience and that we might need to be conscientious about how we were doing things.

posted by Caroline Picard

Newcity published its Best Of 2009 issues and a show curated by Anne Elizabeth Moore featuring print artists from Chicago and Providence was listed in the Top 5 Print Shows of 2009. You can see more of the top five list by going here.

posted by caroline picard

I thought it might be a good time to post some more images of the current show-

I’m not sure why the images want to be sideways, but there is some info about the project:

And We Drew A City Together
Participatory City Building with Collaged Stickers

This project is about authorship of the city- about dictating our environment through individual desire and group effort.
What is this event going to look like?
When you walk in, someone is going to say “Hello.” You will be given a sheet of instructions and an allotment of stickers. On the wall there will be a large map with empty streets and over to one side there will be a table with scissors and markers. The stickers will consist of drawings of architectural elements and complete buildings. You and everyone else will have the job of cutting coloring, augmenting, collaging, and placing the stickers onto the map. Use what you have received and make yourself to build your ideal environment- it can be fantastical, or based on your current reality , there is no final goal. What do you want in a city? Take note – your city plans can and are encouraged to cover over the stickers of a previous participant but  – as conflicting desires may cancel one another, a following participant will soon change or build upon your plans! Together we will navigate the tension between our individual dreams and shared resources.

Before you leave, the city historian will take a picture of you and your construction, so both are remembered forever.
Oh, did we mention that the sheet of instructions is going to be a beautiful letter pressed print that you get to keep?
What do you need to do to prepare?
Think about your ideal city. Think about the one you live in. Come ready to play and explore with friends and strangers.

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posted by Young Joon

from the current show, curated by anne Elizabeth Moore–Without You I am Nothing: Cultural Democracy from Providence and Chicago

March 17, 2009

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pannel the next day–

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posted by Caroline Picard

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There is some amazing stuff going on in the neighborhood tonight. Like Really Awesome. It’s like a whole other kind of circus. To that end, I thought I’d post a little something about things going on along the street so that, should you chose, you can visit other spaces and events.

03.27.09 – 04.25.09!!

Of course, there is the *super fantabulous* Providence RI/Chicago IL show here at the Green Lantern, featuring work by Andrew Oesch, Angee Lennard, Agata Michalowska, Dan S. Wang, Myriel Milicivic, and Kevin Haywood, Delia Kovac, DeWayne Slightweight, Karin Patzke, Heather Ault, Jason Tranchida, Jean Cozzens, Laura Szumowski, Matthew Lawrence, Meg Turner, Rob Ray, Sonnenzimmer, Xander Marro. We’re opening our doors at 6 p.m. this evening. The opening, official, will go until 9 p.m. There will be a stack of invitations by the front of the door. Please take one. i.e. you are invited to this party. Also, in keeping with the tender vulnerabilities of this business license nonsense, we’re going to serve prohibition era beverages, The Greyhound and Annehattans.

From 9/10 pm on there will be live music performances provided by Helen Money, John Bellows, and DeWayne Slightweight from 9-12 am. A donation of five dollars is suggested to watch the music; this event is BYOB.

Also of Note: There will be an artist talk on Saturday at 2 p.m. at the Green Lantern with a whole bunch of participants from Rhode Island.

You can see more about this by going here.

Otherwise:

FRIDAY, March 27th
TAKE A TOUR DOWN MILWAUKEE AVE.!

whoopee

“I Don’t Believe You”
new works by Lauren Anderson, Jamisen Ogg, and Oli Watt.
between 6 & 9 pm
Through May 2nd.
check out Roots & Culture at 1034 n Milwaukee Ave.
&
Elegant Mr. Gallery

1355 N. Milwaukee 3rd Fl.
Doors at 7:30 / Films at 8:00
$5-10 sliding scale

FEATURING…
Nine.5, Keith Wilson, Artist Statement, Daniel Barrow, New Bike, Stephanie Yang, Hey Fox, Tessa Siddle, Hannah Free (trailer), Tracy Baim, So-Called Living, Cyra Polizzi, Rosebud, Ricky Kelley & Scott Ross, Self Control, Latham Zearfoss

&

US (that is the GL)

&

Heaven Gallery

Boombox

Start: 03/27/2009 – 7:00pm
End: 03/27/2009 – 10:00pm

&

Lloyd Dobler

1545 W. Division Second Floor Chicago, IL 60622

Case-By-Case Basis, featuring the print and mixed media work of Diana Behl, Alex Chitty, Regan Golden-McNerney, Joe Hardesty, Noah Hyleck, Jeremy Lundquist, Amanda Repo Taiwo Thomson, and the collaborative work of Ryan McMurran and Shira Soskel.

&

i’m sure there are other things in the area, and if you go to Lloyd Dobler, you can pick up a map to figure out where everything is-

ok. forget the cold snap. happy fridays

and don’t forget this is, like, our second to last opening at this location. Crazy, huh? We’ll make it something to remember.

Without You I Am Nothing

March 19, 2009

The Green Lantern Gallery & Press is pleased to announce a group show,

03.27.09 – 04.25.09

Without You I am Nothing,”

curated by Anne Elizabeth Moore

Featuring work by

Andrew Oesch, Angee Lennard, Agata Michalowska, Dan S. Wang, Myriel Milicivic, Kevin Haywood, Delia Kovac, DeWayne Slightweight, Karin Patzke, Heather Ault, Jason Tranchida, Jean Cozzens, Laura Szumowski, Matthew Lawrence, Meg Turner, Rob Ray, Sonnenzimmer, Xander Marro
In conjunction with the Southern Graphics Council, the opening will be held on Friday, the 27th of March from 6-9
with live musical performances provided by Helen Money, John Bellows, and DeWayne Slightweight from 8-11 pm.
A donation of five dollars is suggested to watch the music

In late capitalist America, we’ve become a bit too used to dealing with our visial culture in a certain way: by viewing it, memorizing it, consuming it. But intrinsically, we know that there are other, more fair ways to respond to the images that mediate our world. Without You I Am Nothing explores two distinct and vibrant worlds of mass-produced, artist-created prompts for cultural democracy, in Providence, Rhode Island and Chicago, Illinois.

These cities, which contain two of the most vibrant screenprinting scenes in the nation, have developed distinct languages for interactive poster-making. Artists in both locales mass-produce (or, sometimes, produce on only a small-scale) images and information that can be manipulated, or shifted, or changed. They are intended not to speak to an audience, but to be susceptible to audience response as well. Without You I am Nothing: Cultural Democracy from Providence and Chicago contains only posters that have one or more of the following elements: stuff that falls off (on purpose), windows, parts that move, space for new information, dials, buttons, removable elements, or other user-controlled, four-dimensional aspects of awesomeness. Simply put, these posters cannot exist without viewers’ input.
By linking the poster-making scenes of two different cities, Without You I am Nothing underscores the distinct visual languages developed for each community: Providence’s tight-knit group of experimental music-influenced, art-educated poster fans, and Chicago’s internationally renowned rock fans used to pristine lines and funny animals.
The print medium is neither site specific nor intrinsically democratic: freedom of the press, after all–the earliest form of mass communication–belongs only to those who own presses. Still, the print medium is the one on which democracy in the US was founded; print-makers have pushed the limits of their medium with innovative design and contents since ink was first put to paper in a desire to communicate with “the masses”.
Without You I am Nothing displays a wide collection of new, recent, and downright old works on paper that require more from the viewer than merely reading about, memorizing information on, and attending the event described in the poster. These may be malleable, 3-dimensional, tactile, transient, or somehow otherwise inclusive of elements that can move, deteriorate, or be removed; or bits that must be rubbed, poked, ripped, pressed, wettened, prodded, or yanked to achieve full poster satisfaction. Full poster satisfaction need not be guaranteed each viewer.
You can see more about this show by going to this link.

posted and written by Caroline Picard

For those of you who are following the story of the Fake New York Times – a paper distributed in New York last week that declarede the Iraq War was over, I thought I’d pass you on to this blog. Here you can read more on the back story. Apparently the Yes-Men had less to do it with than they claimed, and in fact the project included a wider group of collaborators–all working under the hand of Anne Elizabeth Moore. Here’s the link. http://theprivatelifeofthepublicintellectual.wordpress.com/ You can see what you think.